Five Things Faculty Can Actually Do About the Academy, Part 4: On the Importance of Teaching and Being Better Mentors

Author: | Categories: General, Pedagogy, The Discipline No comments
I have started the previous posts in this series with negative aspects or problems in the academy that need to be solved. As academics, we are often trained to operate this way, and that can be a good thing, but it can also be a very discouraging thing, since

The 13 Best Books I Read in 2013

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I’m going to make a confession here: Since finishing graduate school, I’ve read almost no literature for the purposes of research.  I don’t want to make grand generalizations and say “I’ll NEVER read for research again!”, but at this point, I’m really, really enjoying reading fiction only for my

5 Things Faculty Can Actually Do About the Academy, Part 3: The Humanities Resembles a Pyramid Scheme, and We Should Be Bothered By That

Author: | Categories: General, The Discipline 5 Comments
This is the third part in a five part series about what full-time and tenure-track faculty can do about the “crisis” in the humanities. Earlier this fall semester, Dr. Anne-Marie Womack (Tulane), a colleague from my graduate institution, and I had a piece about the academic job market in

5 Things Faculty Can Actually Do About the Academy, Part 2: But I Don’t WANT To, Or How I Learned to Stop Complaining and Love the Committee

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This is the second post in a five part series about how full-time and tenure-track faculty can ameliorate the conditions of the academy.  Last year our Faculty Senate president encouraged all of us to read The Fall of the Faculty and the Rise of the All Administrative University.  Being

5 Things Faculty Can Actually Do About the Academy, Part 1: Celebrate Good Times, C’Mon!

Author: | Categories: General, The Discipline 1 Comment
Often when humanities PhDs are talking about the academic job market or the labor conditions of the academy, there is such a sense of general despair or helplessness that we just become a little snarky. But in a market where people are told that there were 500 other stellar

“Digital Future(s)” Dream Course: Engaging the Print vs. Technology Debates

I took this summer off.  As in, really took it off.  I didn’t teach, I didn’t write, I didn’t really do research, I didn’t do course prep.  I took the summer off.  In part, this was a post-graduate school, post-first year in a full-time job recovery strategy.  Last summer

Thoughts on Feminist Pedagogy, Trolling, and Flaming in First-Year Writing Classes

In my last post for this year’s Day of DH, I blogged about an article I read recently in the context of a current project.  I am working on a multifaceted project about the opportunities for feminist teaching and pedagogy in new forms of writing and in online spaces.  

Day of DH Storify

Author: | Categories: Digital Humanities, Pedagogy No comments
[View the story "Rebecca Harris: Day of DH" on Storify]

Storify for Composition: Some Successes and Some Epic Fails

Author: | Categories: Digital Humanities, Pedagogy 12 Comments
This semester I elected to use Storify for my beginning composition classes for their first two writing projects. My pedagogical justification for using the site was two-fold.  First, as a social media site, Storify provides an opportunity to integrate multimedia into text-based writing.  Since multimedia writing, social networking, and internet

“It’s Just A Joke” and Other Things People Say to Defend Prejudice

UPDATE: After writing this post last week, yet another example–one that dovetails with my other interest, technology–came to light. Adria Richards, an employee of SendGrid, was fired from her job after hackers took down her company’s website because she had the guts to report jokes as sexist at a